Citation

Hallatschek O, Hersen P, Ramanathan S, Nelson DR. 2007. Genetic drift at expanding frontiers promotes gene segregation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 104(50):19926-30. Pubmed: 18056799

Abstract

Competition between random genetic drift and natural selection play a central role in evolution: Whereas nonbeneficial mutations often prevail in small populations by chance, mutations that sweep through large populations typically confer a selective advantage. Here, however, we observe chance effects during range expansions that dramatically alter the gene pool even in large microbial populations. Initially well mixed populations of two fluorescently labeled strains of Escherichia coli develop well defined, sector-like regions with fractal boundaries in expanding colonies. The formation of these regions is driven by random fluctuations that originate in a thin band of pioneers at the expanding frontier. A comparison of bacterial and yeast colonies (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) suggests that this large-scale genetic sectoring is a generic phenomenon that may provide a detectable footprint of past range expansions.

Related Faculty

Photo of Sharad Ramanathan

Sharad Ramanathan studies how the dynamics of the underlying circuits allow cells and organisms to make decisions. To do so he brings together Biology with tools from Applied Math, Microscopy and Microfluidics.

Search Menu